Endocrine Society Praises ABIM's Overhaul of MOC Requirements

February 04, 2015

Contact: Aaron Lohr
Chief Communications Officer
Phone: 202.971.3654
alohr@endocrine.org
Contact: Jenni Glenn Gingery
Associate Director, Communications and Media Relations
Phone: 202.971.3655
jgingery@endocrine.org

Changes reflect Society proposals to improve program

Washington, DC - The Endocrine Society today commended the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) for revamping its Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program in response to widespread outcry from the physician community.

ABIM announced Tuesday that it would suspend some aspects of the MOC program and substantially change others. The Endocrine Society and other organizations representing nearly all internal medicine subspecialties had raised concerns about unintended consequences of changes made to the program in the past year.

“We are satisfied that the ABIM has heard our concerns and is responding with appropriate changes to the MOC program,” said Society President Richard J. Santen, MD. “We fully support the concepts of continuous learning, improvement and self-regulation that the ABIM espouses and recognize that the changes outlined are designed to enhance these processes.”

ABIM incorporated many of the changes the Endocrine Society called for, including adjustments to the MOC program’s fee structure, exam structure and approved activities. These changes will relieve bureaucratic burdens on physicians and allow them to devote more time to providing patient care.

“While ABIM is making key strides in improving the program, the Society continues to call for an evidence-based approach to determine how the MOC system can best support the delivery of quality patient care,” Santen said. “The Society is looking forward to continuing our collaboration with the internal medicine community and the ABIM to ensure the MOC program and the secure exam evolve in a way that is meaningful, supports physician learning and improves patient care.”

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Endocrinologists are at the core of solving the most pressing health problems of our time, from diabetes and obesity to infertility, bone health, and hormone-related cancers. The Endocrine Society is the world’s oldest and largest organization of scientists devoted to hormone research and physicians who care for people with hormone-related conditions.

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