Vitamin D and Vitamin D Binding Protein Levels of Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Relationship with Bone Mineral Metabolism

Presentation Number: SUN 348
Date of Presentation: April 2nd, 2017

Ceyda Dincer*1 and Oguzhan Deyneli2
1Marmara University School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey, 2Marmara Univ Hastanesi, Istanbul, Turkey

Abstract

Aim: Vitamin D deficiency is known to be associated with metabolic bone diseases. In this current study we aimed to investigate vitamin D, vitamin D binding protein levels, and the association between the calculated bioactive and free vitamin D levels with bone turnover markers and bone mineral metabolism of type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients who admitted to endocrinology outpatient clinic.

 

Method: In this cross-sectional study, 60 type 1 DM patients who admitted to endocrinology outpatient clinic and 60 healthy controls with comparable age, gender and body mass index from November 2015 to March 2016 were included. During outpatient visit, height, weight and waist circumference is measured, and the disease duration and opthalmologic examination within last year for retinopathy is questioned. 8 hour fasting blood samples are collected for 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), vitamin d bindng protein, osteocalcin, bone alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and c-telopeptide (CTX), centrifuged and stored at -20 degree. All samples are studied at the same time.

Results: Serum 25(OH)D levels of type 1 DM patients were significantly higher than control group (p=0.01). %63.3 of type 1 DM patients and %78 of healthy controls have vitamin D levels less than 20 ng/ml and there was no significant difference between two groups. Parathormone levels of the vitamin D deficient individuals were significantly higher (p=0.029). There were no significant difference between vitamin D binding protein levels of two groups. Free and bioactive vitamin D levels were positively correlated with 25(OH)D and negatively correlated with vitamin d binding protein. Free and bioactive vitamin D were not significantly correlated with serum c-telopeptid, bone alkaline phosphatase levels, only free vitamin D levels correlated negatively with osteocalcin levels (r=-0.201). There was a significant negative correlation between 25(OH)D and parathormone levels (r=-0.294) Serum osteocalcin, bone alkaline phosphatase and c-telopeptide levels of the control group were significantly higher.

 

Conclusion: Contrary to previous studies 25(OH)D levels of type 1 DM patients were higher than the healthy controls in our study. This situation can be associated with that type 1 DM patients have more visits to hospital or this can be associated with nutrition or dressing habits. Calculated free and bioactive vitamin D levels didn’t give any additional information about the effect of vitamin D on bone metabolism.

 

Nothing to Disclose: CD, OD