The Endocrine Society Mourns the Passing of Dr. Elwood Jensen

Aaron Lohr
Director, Media Relations
Phone: (240) 482-1380
Email: alohr@endo-society.org

Chevy Chase, MD— The Endocrine Society leadership is sad to announce that valued member, Dr. Elwood Jensen, died on December 16, 2012 in Cincinnati, Ohio.  Dr. Jensen served as president of The Endocrine Society from June 1980 to June 1981.

Dr. Jensen was the recipient of the Society’s Fred Conrad Koch Award in 1984, the highest honor bestowed by the Society. He received the award for his pioneering research in hormone receptors which opened the door to new life-saving treatments for breast cancer. Jensen’s work led to the establishment of biochemical “receptors” as a new field of scientific research, leading to many more medical breakthroughs.

“Jensen’s revolutionary research has saved lives and his discovery of estrogen receptors is clearly one of the highest achievements in the field of endocrinology,” said Scott Hunt, executive director and CEO of The Endocrine Society. “He will be greatly missed.”

Dr. Jensen was the George J. and Elizabeth Wile Chair in Cancer Research at the University of Cincinnati and the Charles B. Huggins Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus in the Ben May Department for Cancer Research and the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Chicago. Additional honors bestowed upon Dr. Jensen during his distinguished career include the 2004 Albert Lasker Medical Research Award and multiple nominations for the Nobel Prize.

A memorial service for Dr. Jensen will be held at 11 a.m. on Thursday, Jan. 10 in Rieveschl Auditorium in the Vontz Center for Molecular Studies at the University of Cincinnati. The university has established the Elwood Jensen Lectureship Fund in his memory. Gifts can be made to University of Cincinnati Foundation, PO Box 670544, Cincinnati, Ohio  45221-0544.

 

 

# # #

Founded in 1916, The Endocrine Society is the world's oldest, largest, and most active organization devoted to research on hormones and the clinical practice of endocrinology. Today, The Endocrine Society's membership consists of over 16,000 scientists, physicians, educators, nurses and students in more than 100 countries. Together, these members represent all basic, applied, and clinical interests in endocrinology. The Endocrine Society is based in Chevy Chase, Md. To learn more about the Society, and the field of endocrinology, visit our web site at www.endo-society.org.