The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Journal Article

Estradiol and Risk of Thromboembolism in Men

August 09, 2021
 

Maria Nethander, Johan Quester, Liesbeth Vandenput, Claes Ohlsson
The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 106, Issue 8, August 2021, Pages e3078–e3086
https://doi.org/10.1210/clinem/dgab164

Abstract

Context

An association was recently reported between genetic markers related to high testosterone and increased risk of thromboembolism in men, but a possible causal role of estradiol for risk of thromboembolism in men remains unknown.

Objective

This work aimed to determine whether endogenous estradiol has a causal role in thromboembolism in men.

Methods

A 2-sample mendelian randomization study using gene-based genetic instruments assessed the association between endogenous estradiol genetically predicted by 22 variants in the aromatase CYP19A1 gene region and the risk of thromboembolism (5815 cases) in 170 593 unrelated men of White ancestry in the UK Biobank. The main outcome measure included thromboembolism based on self-reports, hospital episodes, and death.

Results

Endogenous estradiol genetically predicted by variants in the CYP19A1 gene region was inversely associated with the risk of thromboembolism (odds ratio per SD increase in estradiol 0.74; 95% CI, 0.62–0.90). In contrast, genetic variants in the JMJD1C gene, used as a predictor of high endogenous testosterone, were associated with an increased risk of thromboembolism (odds ratio per SD increase in testosterone 1.39; 95% CI, 1.12–1.72). Subsequent explorative analyses evaluating potential repercussions of thromboembolism revealed that endogenous estradiol genetically predicted by variants in the CYP19A1 gene region was inversely associated with the risk of ischemic stroke (0.68; 95% CI, 0.49–0.95) but not myocardial infarction (0.97; 95% CI, 0.84–1.13).

Conclusion

Genetically predicted estradiol was inversely associated with the risk of thromboembolism and ischemic stroke in men. The ratio between testosterone and estradiol, determined by CYP19A1 activity, may contribute to the overall impact of sex steroids on thromboembolism in men.

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