Advocacy

Advocacy in Action

August 07, 2022

Senate on Verge of Historic Vote on Insulin Affordability; Endocrine Society Continues Advocacy for People with Diabetes 

On August 6, the US Senate is expected to begin voting on the Inflation Reduction Act, which includes provisions that would make insulin more affordable.  The legislation would institute a $35/month cap on out-of-pocket costs for certain people and lower the price of insulin by allowing Medicare to negotiate its price. The Endocrine Society has worked for years to achieve legislation to do this.  We provided recommendations to policy makers on policy options; we worked with Representatives and Senators on both sides of the aisle to find consensus; we conducted briefings; we testified before Congress, we conducted Hill Days, congressional meetings, and grassroots advocacy. In the days leading up to the vote the Society continues to communicate with the Senate, including special outreach to Senator Sinema whose vote was initially unclear and now affirmative. We also continue to advocate that the out-of-pocket cap apply to both people with Medicare and those with private insurance.   

We will keep our members apprised of developments. Until the Senate takes final action, please join our online advocacy campaign so that your senators will know how important this is to you and your patients. Our advocacy is making a difference! 

Endocrine Society Advocates for Better Regulation of PFAS:  

On July 27, the Endocrine Society along with over 80 public health, environmental, and consumer organizations sent a letter to the Biden Administration urging designation of PFOA and PFOS as hazardous substances. These chemicals are two of the most high-profile members of the class of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). Designation of these chemicals as hazardous substances would be an important first step in holding polluters accountable for the health and environmental effects on communities who have been dealing with the consequences of exposure to these ‘forever chemicals’ for decades. The Endocrine Society has been a longstanding advocate for better controls for these and other EDCs.  In August, we will work with our US EDC Task Force to engage with the Office of Science and Technology Policy on a federal research strategy for PFAS.   

National Academies Host Workshop on Children’s Environmental Health 

On August 1-4, the National Academies of Sciences Engineering and Medicine conducted a workshop titled Children’s Environmental Health: A Workshop on Future Priorities for Environmental Health Sciences. This free and public event, with over 1,000 virtual attendees, explored the vulnerabilities of different developmental stages to environmental exposures. The Endocrine Society’s Scientific Statement on Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDC), and other published evidence, were cited as an example of major environmental threats to children’s health. Workshop participants discussed how climate change is exacerbating EDC exposures and other threats, as the Heat Health Study Group presented evidence of prenatal exposure to heat waves leading to increased incidence of preterm birth and lower birth weights. However, there is hope for the future: a major theme of the workshop was to identify how the Environmental Protection Agency could better incorporate new research into their assessments to create a safer environment for children and other vulnerable populations. 

NIH Issues RFI on Strategic Plan for Research on the Health of Women 

The Office of Research on Women’s Health (ORWH) is updating the NIH-Wide Strategic Plan for Research on the Health of Women. On July 22, ORWH issued a request for information (RFI) to solicit feedback from the public on emerging research needs and cross-disciplinary objectives for women’s health research. Five years ago, the Endocrine Society responded to a similar RFI; our comments can be found here. We strongly supported the Specialized Centers for the Study of Sex Differences to conduct sex differences research in specific areas, which was featured in their most recent strategic plan. If you have any ideas or suggestions for emerging research needs and opportunities in women’s health research to inform how the Society responds to the new RFI, please contact Alyssa Scott, PhD at [email protected]

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We rely on your voice to advocate for our policy priorities. Join us to show our strength as a community that cares about endocrinology. Contact your U.S representatives or European Members of Parliament through our online platform. Take action and make a difference today.

We rely on your voice to advocate for our policy priorities. Join us to show our strength as a community that cares about endocrinology. Contact your U.S representatives or European Members of Parliament through our online platform. Take action and make a difference today.

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For 100 years, the Endocrine Society has been at the forefront of hormone science and public health. Read about our history and how we continue to serve the endocrine community.